PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2011

Walk to Work has certainly been the biggest news making activity in 2011. No wonder it was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.The Police and Army particularly came to the forefront on criticism by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.In total, 10 people were killed through out the walk to work series.

 From July 7, 2009, Kampala bombing, security vigilance in Uganda has taken a different turn. Mettle scanners have been erected in almost every corner of Kampala. From discotheques, shopping malls to bars. The threat of Al shabaab remains very much in the thoughts of many.This particular picture was taken by a security detail of President Museveni during a camera check moments before i was cleared to attend President Paul Kagame’s presser at Munyonyo on December 12,2011.I’ve personally had countless checks of this kind this year, a constant reminder of how unsafe we are.

 A  heart broken Ugandan. A  heart broken nation. Uganda’s wait to participate in the African Cup of Nations continues to stretch to well.., three decades and still counting. A win against bitter rivals and neighbours, Kenya would have rewritten that history but it wasn’t meant to be.Instead, a goalless draw attracted angry reactions from the thousands, perhaps millions of Ugandans from every corner of the country who hoped to finally pop a 30 year old champagne.

Walk to Work has certainly been the biggest news making activity in 2011. No wonder it was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.The Police and Army particularly came to the forefront on criticism by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.In total, 10 people were killed through out the walk to work series.Here a protester prepares to block a road in Kireka,a suburb of Kampala, Uganda’s capital on April 18,2011.

Walk to Work has certainly been the biggest news making activity in 2011. No wonder it was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.The Police and Army particularly came to the forefront on criticism by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.In total, 10 people were killed through out the walk to work series. Opposition leader for Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) Kiiza Besigye “installed” himself as the face of the protests.I needed an up-close with the man who involuntarily imposed himself as the face of the walk to work protests and this shot did it for me.

This picture will remain in my memory for as long as i live. With the rumoured death of opposition leader for Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) Kiiza Besigye, after a brutal arrest while participating in the walk to work protests, riots engulfed most parts of the city. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.I was taking pictures downtown Kampala that morning where every street was burning with something.The security was struggling to maintain order and looked over stretched. I was moving with a group of six soldiers who were firing point blank at protesters.I was stunned. Within minutes i saw two nearly lifeless bodies being carried onto the middle of the road. They were still alive but without standby ambulance, they slowly breathed their last on a dusty, smokey downtown Kampala.

Paul Kagame, Rwandan President addresses the media at the Commonwealth Resort Hotel Munyonyo on December 12, 2011. Relations between Rwanda and Uganda have been on the ice for a long time. Paul Kagame’s visit follows a similar one by Museveni in July to Rwanda as the two nations try to at least publicly address their strained relations.It was a significant visit being a first in over a half a decade for a country barely a 30 minute flight away.

Walk to Work has certainly been the biggest news making activity in 2011. No wonder it was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.The Police and Army particularly came to the forefront on criticism by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.In total, 10 people were killed through out the walk to work series.I found this particular picture very interesting.This protester was arrested,instructed to take off his shirt and forced to sit in the middle of the road awaiting a police patrol pick up.You could see him bargain with the policeman who seemed to be threatening him with a teargas can he’s holding.

A village woman carries a pot to the market in Lira district, north of Uganda’s capital, Kampala. According to a UN report; In agriculture, sub-Saharan Africa’s most vital economic sector, women contribute 60–80 per cent of labour in food production, both for household consumption and for sale. But while they do most of the work, they lack access to markets and credit. In Uganda, women make up 53 per cent of the labour force, but only sell 11 per cent of the cash crops.

I was in Dar salaam, Tanzania on the invitation of AMEND to shoot some of their projects. AMEND is an organization that focuses on the neglected epidemic of childhood traffic injury in Africa. Part of my duty was to shoot pictures of shanty households of Dar es salaam, while asking them simple questions about road accidents in their neighbourhood.I realised that women in these neighbourhoods are restricted indoors.They wake up, clean the house, compound and remain indoors as the men ventured out to work.This was just one of thousands i encountered.

A displaced boy is seen seated near one of many makeshift houses built since the National Forestry Authority (NFA) and Police forcefully evicted up to 20.000 people in Kiboga and Mubende districts to allocate the land to New Forests Company (NFC) to plant trees as part of a lucrative scramble for arable land that can be used to satisfy the multi-billion dollar carbon trading ponzi scheme, which is worth $1.8 million a year to the company

Walk to Work has certainly been the biggest news making activity in 2011. No wonder it was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.The Police and Army particularly came to the forefront on criticism by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.In total, 10 people were killed through out the walk to work series.

 Opposition leader for Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) Kiiza Besigye, is brutally arrested by plane clothed security men on April 28, 2011 while driving to work. His car windshields were broken by a pistol butt, before he was sprayed with pepper spray before being arrested. It was the most brutal arrest Ugandans had ever witnessed. No wonder Walk to Work was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year.The Police and Army particularly were critisized by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.

A boy mines sand on the banks of river Nile in Kayunga district.Many more like him have dropped out of to mine sandin Kayunga, 74km (46miles) northeast of the capital, Kampala. Child labour remain a pivotal issue in Uganda. On the banks of river Nile in Busaana Sub-County, children usually descend in the middle of the waters, scoop the sand which they transport on the boats to the river banks from where it’s sold at between Shs150,000 (USD 57) and Shs180,000 (USD 69) depending on the size of the lorry truck.

Relatives transport the remains of children wrapped in papyrus mats for burial, on a pick-up truck from a local morgue, in Kiryandongo, 210 km (130 miles) north of Uganda’s capital Kampala, June 29, 2011. A lightning strike killed 18 children and their. Uganda has one of the highest rates of lightning strike deaths in the world and its capital Kampala has more days of lightning per year than any other city, according to the World Meteorological Organization

A child and her teenage mother attend the Isis-Wicce peace expo in Kasese in November of 2011. Almost 40 percent of Ugandan women aged between 15 and 49 have experienced some form of sexual violence in their lifetime according to a 2006 report by the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey. The report further states that one in four Ugandan women said their first sexual intercourse was against their will.

According to the Uganda Population and Housing Census, the elderly (60+) make up about 6.5% of the population. Of these, 85% who live in rural areas live in absolute poverty according to The Aged Family Uganda (TAFU). Among other challenges the elderly face include; poor access to services and utilities, limited income support, exclusion from development programmes, lack of political representation, Isolation. As a result, this age group has resorted to selling their property, begging, forcing their teenage daughters to marry among others. Despite formal representation provided for in local government, a national Department of Elderly and Disability under the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development, these initiatives have had little impact on improving the daily lives of older persons in Uganda.

Disputed or not, President Museveni got another five year mandate as president of Uganda. A 68% outcome evoked lukewarm national celebrations. But at Kololo Airstrip from where he was sworn in, the mood was definitely hyper.Painted bodies, faces, yellows bandannas, yellow attires, yellow shoes..everything within the vicinity was either yellow or close it it. It was a historical date in Uganda’s history.

Walking a lone street, downtown Kampala.Walk to Work has certainly been the biggest news making activity in 2011. No wonder it was voted by The Economist magazine as number three of the top African stories this year. These protests were against high food and fuel prices.The Police and Army particularly came to the forefront on criticism by Human rights bodies for their excessive force on unarmed peaceful protesters.In total, 10 people were killed through out the walk to work series.

 In my observation, 2011 has been dominated mainly by UMEME, Walk to Work and the Oil debate. Here, i was  walking around the city asking traders how they were copying up with power shortages. This particular one was  Ssentongo Daniel a metal fabricator in Luzira, a Kampala suburb. He told me of how he has failed on several occasions to meet customer deadlines due to power unreliability causing enormous loses for his business. He projects a wider national picture which has been characterised by several protests against UMEME.

225 thoughts on “PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2011

    • Mamerito, you have already said enough. Thanks for such a huge approval. I know there are lots of smart photographers out there..They just need to come out and show what they got!

  1. Wow. Such beautiful and moving photos. These are the types of images that make me appreciate all of the good things in my life just a little bit more.

    Excellent work!

  2. We are going to visit Uganda early next year with charity travel (charitytravel.blogspot.com) and looking forward to supporting and promoting charitable projects there. We work independently with the community initiatives at the very grassroots and welcome any cooperation. Also see http://www.kindmankind.net our platform for change makers.

  3. These photos are brilliant. As a performing artist, I have to say you have definitely sparked and inspired my own creativity. Keep up the amazing work you’re doing.

  4. With these expertly photographed pictures, it can honestly be said that an image is worth a thousand words. I commend you on your courage to take photos amidst the danger of the locales you visited, and your skill as well. I thank you for helping tell the stories of these people – for being the voice of the silent. I believe we all do appreciate this. These truly are the pictures of the year 2011.

  5. I’m at a loss for words. I didn’t know whether I should smile or cry. The photos are astounding. The truth of what life is about has been captured–leaving the viewer at a loss of what to say.

    val

    http:valentinedefrancis.wordpress.com

  6. Very powerful images you have here. Way to raise awareness visually on what’s happening over there. Images speak louder than words. Sometimes people only beleive and take action once they see for themselves. Great work

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  8. Pingback: ECHWALU’S PHOTOGRAPHS OF 2011 ARE WELL WORTH A LOOK « Horiwood's Blog

  9. Superbly photographed you are most certainly a TALENTED photographer. You have captured social and historical moments in time that people need to be reminded that injustice is still present. Images like these are a reminder of how inhumane we can be towards each other.

  10. Your pictures tell an invaluable story about Africa: the culture, tradition, ignorance, greed, stupidity and potential to learn from mistakes for the good of Africans and the world.

  11. Wow! God has really blessed you with not only a great eye for photography, but being in the right place at the right time. The way you capture the emotions and issues surrounding every situation is incredible.

    Keep up the good work! I look forward to seeing more from you.

  12. Congratulations on being freshly pressed Eddie, not least because the story you are telling, through these very moving and superb photographs, is one of injustice and brutality; a story that needs to be told. Again and again until the whole world is listening and chooses to act.
    Humbling….

  13. Wow! I am stunned. Your photography is so special — I am from Dar es Salaam and seeing these photos have touched my heart. Have you thought of filming? You have pulse, passion and an absolute wonderful expression in conveying the deepness within. Totally love your photos!
    Stay blessed and much more success I wish you.

  14. WOW. Amazing captures beyond words. I am floored. These images are magnificent and very telling on their own without the commentary. Thank you for sharing a piece of your soul and visual perspective with us.🙂

  15. good pictures but is that all we have in Africa (Uganda)? why do we blacks make fun of own selves? don’t you have one good building in your country? don’t you have one good road in your country? let us try and share with the world some positive stories about countries in Africa. some people are living on the streets in the USA with bad heath services, how many times have Americans captured these pictures?. you take bad pictures and they praise you, of what gains are they. please, you can be objective in your photo shot next time; get the good and the bad. well done! http://princedapace.wordpress.com. http://relationandloveadvice.blogspot.com

  16. Pingback: Pictures of the year 2011. « Henrique Yasuda

  17. Your photographs of African events truly break my heart. I long for world peace that we can all get along with plenty of prosperity, food, water, shelter, etc to go around for everyone. I hope we finally reach a peaceful place in 2012.

    • thats how professionals have to behave. Respect those who make who you are and certainly you will get respect..I don’t like photographing dead bodies because its just not right but we have to inform the world at the same time. So striking the balance is really crucial!

  18. Moved to tears by these photos, Edward, but pleased that Freshly Pressed has helped shine a light on your mission.

    I lived in Kiboga for a year as a teacher in 1996 and the experience was life changing. Am currently working for CARE International, who address many of the social issues catalogued so uniquely in your blog.

    Long may your talent and your advocacy find new audiences.

  19. Edward,
    You’ve got an amazing photography hand and skills! What type of camera do you use? I would really like to feature you as a guest post or interview at my blog!

    • Thank you Ryan.I use a canon 5D Mark II and Canon 7D. Plus 16mm f2 n 70mm f2. Well, looking forward to your email. I wouldn’t mind sharing my experience as photojournalist in Uganda/Africa with the rest of the world

  20. Here in the Diaspora, a warrior remarked that she wished she had photographs of Harlem, New York, as, today, it’s very different from how it was when she was growing up. You record a Uganda that will change. It’s up to us Africans to change Uganda for the better! But thank you for keeping the record and bringing it to the world!

    Hotep! Please continue your work!

    http://africanbloodsiblings.wordpress.com/

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  22. The little boy mining sand in the Nile is stunning in it’s composition and subject matter. Here in America kids throw a fit if they have to as much as carry out the trash. Here I count my blessing and pray for those less fortunate. As a mother, I want to hold that child. How easy it is for us to forget that outside our worlds ther is a bigger world that struggles to live each day.

  23. What draws me the most is that you captured the pain, the fear, the uncertainty and hunger in the eyes of your subjects. That is impressive. You spoke in their behalf and the world knew their struggles through you. stay blessed in what you do…

  24. Eddie, i almost expected this, very hot stuff though. I like the picture of the woman from Dar-esalam, seated in compound, portrait of old woman on population, Dr. Besigye’ portrait and the police on guard. Thanks for sharing. merry x-mas and fruitful 2012

  25. You are a wizard with that camera. I think if I were given the same camera I wouldnt come near to what you are doing. I have lived every breathtaking pain, enxiety and overwhelming despair of your subjects. Thanks for reminding us, more than words could do, of what is happenining in UGanda.

  26. Pingback: PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2011 | Digital Delights - Image Editing | Scoop.it

  27. You are a great, great photographer, but what bleeds out from these photographs is the life of Uganda, the turmoil, terror, constrictions, sadness, and even everydayness of life there. Is that not the job of photographers? Good work.

  28. A picture tells a story that would take thousands of words, and your pictures certainly do. Here in the UK, we too rarely hear news from the various regions of Africa. Your photo stories have certainly redressed that imbalance. Thank you.

  29. anybody else think that maybe if, the opportunity to be on the cover of Newsweek, was removed from the equation, the younger generation might not be so willing to perpetuate so much violence. just a thought….

  30. Fantastic pictures! I look forward to following your blog. I really like how you amplify issues of gender, development and politics through your lens, these issues really need the attention! Wonderful work.

  31. i don’t understand. why is there so much violence, poverty, corruption in this part of the world. i think it is because big companies strip the land of natural resources leaving nothing for the locals. am i correct? is it that simple?

  32. you’ve captured life.
    pure life.
    i read that your father it’s in a bad situation so i hug you two and wish for you a better future,or maybe only a future can be a good point to start.

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  39. Hello Edward,
    I recently came across your photographs and was blown away. These are amazing! I found myself particularly taken by a photo of an elderly woman. I liked it so much I made a drawing of it (I do art as a hobby), and I posted it to my webpage: http://joevandello.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/portrait-14/
    But I realized I never asked for your permission to use the photograph in my drawing. With your permission, I’d like to keep the picture posted, and also give you credit for your great photo by referencing it in my description. Please let me know if this would be okay. Count me as a new fan!
    Best,
    Joe V.

    • Joe, thank you for visiting my blog and also appreciating my work. For the picture, its ok. You can use it. And thanks for being kind enough to ask for permission to use it because i’ve met people who just pluck and use. Am glad to know i have a new fan. That encourages me my friend. Am sure i will closely monitor your work as well.

      Cheers

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